New Fad: Blogger Profiles

I can’t fathom doing another Retrosheet project on 2006 right now, and I think between “Climbing Out of the Canyon” and the roundtables, 2007 has been thoroughly previewed. I could take a look a Pirates’ history, but that’s Randy’s forte, not mine. I’d take a day off (you’d like that, wouldn’t you?) but I feel like writing. So, here goes nothing…
I’m borrowing a concept from my days at MLBlogs. Over there, they call these things Spheroids. Nine questions and answers (a nice baseball number) that turn a blogger into more than just a name on a computer screen. If you’d like to participate, copy and paste the questions onto your blog and throw in your answers. Be sure to leave your link in the comments section so I can check them out.
1. What are the best reasons that other baseball fans should visit your blog?
I’m more optimistic than Pat; less cynical than Nicolas; younger than Rowdy and Bones; more East Coast than Charlie; more black and gold than Carson and Corey; more grounded in reality than Jake; and venerable when compared to Matt and Alan, DJ, Dave and Matt. And I’m easier to take care of than The Parrot: No “squawkings and droppings” here.
And come on, you’re not going to read a Red Sox blog, are you?
2. What was your favorite post?

This one, I think. It’s the first post from Pittsburgh Pirates Roundtable, an effort that I took part in starting and continue to coordinate. If you’re not familiar with us, you should be. Each Monday and Thursday our panel of bloggers releases a discussion focused around two Pirate-related questions. We’ve come a long way from our humble beginnings, and we’ll continue to improve as time goes on.
3. What is the most unique blogging experience you’ve ever had?
The voice of Summer in Pittsburgh, Lanny Frattare, mentioned me on a broadcast after I sent him the link to a post I wrote as a response to a prompt he gave to the viewing audience. Then again, there’s the e-mail I got from Cuba after I wrote about the Bucs’ signing of Yoslan Herrera. That one was pretty strange, too. Gotta love Google.
4. Favorite blogs, including at least one at MVN:
I have to be like that annoying tag-along little brother who won’t leave you alone when you’re trying to act cool with your friends, but I can’t help myself from reading and commenting on Where Have You Gone, Andy Van Slyke?, another Pirates blog. Pat often sees the game differently than I do, and I like his insight.
I try to check Sportsfilter daily for my non-hardball news. I like the ESPN Insider blogs maintained by Peter Gammons, Buster Olney and Keith Law. And I’m a fan of Tony’s work at The Confluence, which is where I get my hockey fix.
On MVN? I find myself reading The Cub Reporter a lot. It’s good to hear the enemy’s point of view sometimes, and those guys do it right.
5. What would you be doing if you weren’t blogging?
There’s a chance that I’d be reading. I have a (growing) pile of baseball books to get through, including Red Smith on Baseball, Ball Four by Jim Bouton and Ten Rings by Yogi Berra. I have the terrible habit of getting three-quarters of the way through a book and not finishing it. I’ve done that with Moneyball, 3 Nights in August and Pete Rose’s autobiography. A quick recommendation for you aspiring journalists (or baseball fans, or newspaper readers): Full Swing by Ira Berkow was one that I read from cover to cover. That’s two thumbs up on my scale.
6. Where do you think the blogosphere is going?
It’s going to continue to boom. Is there any other option? Newspapers are so last century. As Evan Brunell wrote, blogging allows for a “horizontal flow of information” that you can’t get reading The New York Times. People are more involved with their subjects and writing more than ever. I’m glad that I’ve jumped on board MVN for the ride.
7. Favorite team and why?
Uh, the Pirates. I was born and raised in Pittsburgh, and I still live about 25 minutes from downtown. I’ve never been anywhere else quite like the Steel City.
8. What is one thing most people don’t know about you?
I go to school at Greg Brown’s alma mater, Point Park University. I’ve transferred twice (from Pitt to Washington & Jefferson to PPU), three times if you count not going to NYU after backing out of an early-decision acceptance. I’ve also changed majors twice (from business to math to journalism). I get A’s. And I went to elementary school with Bill Cowher’s oldest daughter.
9. Happiness is…
The left field reserved bleachers on a businessman’s Thursday afternoon. Preferably it’d be May, but I won’t be picky. Primanti’s, Yuengling and good friends. The game would go about 12 or 13 innings, and the Bucs would win in walk-off fashion. The perfect day.

Author: PLCArchives

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  • http://www.universityupdate.com/BigEast/Pittsburgh/969165.aspx?src=blog Anonymous

    University Update

    New Fad: Blogger Profiles…

  • http://tilnextyear.blogspot.com Matt

    Your description of happiness sounds very familiar. I had a very similar experience on 06/01/2006, narrowly missing out on your May preference. I spent that Thursday afternoon in the second row behind the left field fence. It only went nine innings, but Jose Castillo hit a two-run walk-off homer with two outs in the 9th and we wildly celebrated. They correctly changed the ruling to a double, but Ryan Doumit followed with a game-winning single. That’s two walk-off celebrations in one afternoon. It doesn’t get any better than that.
    Matt
    Wait ‘Til Next Year

  • http://www,the-parrot.blogspot.com Steve

    I’m easier to take care of than you think! The droppings fall onto newpaper copies of Bob Smizik’s column in the Post Gazette.

  • http://mvn.com/mlb-pirates Cory Humes

    I was there for that one too, Matt. My buddies and I were in the last section on the third base line in the first row. (It helps to know a few ushers, especially for those empty Thursday games.) That whole series was a good one.