Pirates Notebook: Sanchez and Wilson offered extensions

According to Dejan Kovacevic of the PPG, the Pittsburgh Pirates have approached Jack Wilson and Freddy Sanchez about contract extensions. As would be expected, the fates of both players will be tied, as the only way one will sign is if the other also signs.

According to DK, the Pirates will need to hear something soon, so they can make a decision on whether to trade Sanchez and/or Wilson before the July 31st trade deadline.

I’ve mentioned several times that I think the Pirates should extend Jack Wilson, due to the lack of options internally to replace him. Sanchez is in a similar situation.

I know the Pirates are rebuilding, but it makes more sense to keep these two, rather than trade them. The return for Wilson would be minimal. The return for Sanchez would probably be below his value to us on the field and at the plate.

The defense is the big thing. The best part of the Pirates this season has been the pitching and defense. The pitching has mostly been doing well due to the infield defense. Zach Duke, Paul Maholm, and Charlie Morton are all above average ground ball pitchers, with Ross Ohlendorf also above average at times.

Downgrading Jack and Freddy would hurt more than those two positions. It would also hurt the pitching staff, especially since every pitcher that Neal Huntington acquires seems to be a ground ball pitcher. Think about it. How many times have we been bailed out by a key double play? The Pirates currently rank third in the majors with 230 double plays, and third in the majors in UZR. Both feats are due mostly to Jack and Freddy.

As far as money goes, I’m not going to assume the Pirates would get a home town discount for either player, but I will assume that they will sign for less than their 2010 figures. I’m guessing no more than $4 M a year for Jack, considering he’s a very similar player statistically to Orlando Cabrera, and Cabrera recently got a 1 year/$4 M deal with Oakland in the off-season.

As for Sanchez, I disagree that $8 M is too much for him, and I could realistically see him signing for anywhere between $6-8 M a year. I’m going to guess three year deals for each player, with Jack getting $12 M, and Sanchez getting $18 M.

Other Stuff

-The Pittsburgh Pirates Prospect Watch for 7/16 is up.

-News on the Miguel Angel Sano front from Jorge Arangure, via Twitter:

“Bottom line is Sano wants to sign with #Pirates, and agent wants him to sign with whoever offers most $, whether it’s Pirates or not”

“Biggest problem for Sano is that teams that offer most $ (#redsox, #Yankees) don’t like dealing with his agent.”

“For me, the gap in $ between #Pirates and everyone else has to be very wide for him to sign elsewhere”

“All deals with Latin American players are not final until the investigation is concluded. Sano could agree to terms with team”

Looking good for the Pirates on the Sano front, according to Arangure.

-Jim at North Side Notch has more from his top 10 prospect countdown: #3, Jose Tabata and #2, Brad Lincoln. I’m on the edge of my seat waiting to see who gets #1.

-Brian at Raise the Jolly Roger reviews his Opening Day expectations.

-Jon at The “Mc” Effect went to the Altoona game tonight, and has a recap and pictures. I used to live in Altoona, and went to that amusement park all the time. Some nice nostalgic moments reading that post, except they built the ball park about two years after I moved, so I’ve never been there.

-I was going to do a “Things to look forward to in the second half” post, but I’m going to hold off until tomorrow. Tomorrow afternoon I’m taking a test as part of my process to be able to teach in Virginia, so I’ve been preparing the last few days (although it’s a reading and writing comprehension test, so I guess if I’m not prepared by now, I’m screwed). I also went to see Transformers 2 tonight with my wife (and I was extremely disappointed), so I didn’t get time to type it up.

I will probably have it up by tomorrow night at the latest. My test is conveniently in Lynchburg, and Jeff Locke is on the mound tomorrow, so I might catch the game afterwards. That will determine when it gets posted.

Tim Williams

Author: Tim Williams

Tim is the owner and editor in chief of Pirates Prospects. He started the site in January 2009, and turned it into his full time job during the 2011 season. Prior to starting Pirates Prospects, Tim worked with AccuScore.com, providing MLB, NHL, and NFL coverage to various national media outlets, including ESPN Insider, USA Today, Yahoo Sports, and the Wall Street Journal. He also writes the annual Prospect Guide, which is sold through the site. Tim lives in Bradenton, where he provides live coverage all year of Spring Training, mini camp, instructs, the Bradenton Marauders, and the GCL Pirates.

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  • Jim Rosati

    Yeah…I still haven't decided yet myself.

  • Tim Williams

    I'm guessing it's down to 3: Singh, Patel, and Gift.

  • http://twitter.com/jfredland jfredland

    Jolly Roger Rewind:
    April 28, 1985

    More than a quarter-century before phrases like “All in,”
    “#Hurdled,” and “#JerryMealsSaysItsSafe” entered Pittsburgh’s baseball lexicon,
    the dispositive moment in a Pirates-Mets game revolved around one Clinton
    Merrick Hurdle.  Unfortunately for
    the Pirates, their future manager’s moment in the spotlight decided the contest in the Mets’ favor: his eighteenth-inning smash off the glove of Jason Thompson for an error
    scored Mookie Wilson with the winning run in a 5-4 New York victory at Shea
    Stadium.

     

    Gary Carter had opened the eighteenth by drawing a walk off
    Lee Tunnell, the twenty-third Pirate to see action in the contest.  Wilson, the twentieth Met to take the
    field, pinch-ran for Carter and took third on Darryl Strawberry’s single.  That set the stage for Hurdle, whom Bob
    Hertzel’s Pittsburgh Press story
    described as “the one-time Sports
    Illustrated cover boy, a third-string catcher and utility player with the
    Mets.”

    The Mets’ free-baseball triumph spoiled an impressive Bucco
    pitching performance.  Facing a
    lineup powered by the career-prime likes of Carter, Strawberry and Keith
    Hernandez, the Pirate moundsmen settled down after Strawberry’s first inning
    grand slam off rookie Mike Bielecki and held the home team hitless for the next
    ten and two-thirds innings.  Rafael
    Santana’s single off Cecilio Guante to lead off the bottom of the twelfth broke
    up the “no hitter,” but Guante ultimately earned his stripes by pitching out of
    a bases-loaded, no outs jam that inning and proceeding to pitch four more scoreless
    innings.

     

    Less praiseworthy was the Bucs’ baserunning,
    short-circuiting an eighteen hit/seven walk/two home run offensive showing with
    three runners caught stealing, one runner picked off, one runner thrown out at
    home plate by an outfielder (leftfielder Hurdle gunning down George Hendrick), one runner
    thrown out at home plate by an infielder, and one runner thrown out trying to
    score on a wild pitch.  For good
    measure, the Pirates also hit into three double plays.

     

    “Pirates’ marathon lost on last Hurdle” proclaimed the next
    day’s Pittsburgh Press, as
    Pittsburgh’s headline writers relished the easy pun.

     

    Here’s the box score and play-by-play:

     

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYN/NYN198504280.shtml

     

    Here’s the Pittsburgh Press’ account:

     

    http://tinyurl.com/d3q5sl6