Pittsburgh Pirates Prospect Watch 8/18/10

INDIANAPOLIS INDIANS (AAA)

Lincoln

GAME STORY

Indianapolis beat Toledo 4-1.  Brad Lincoln (W, 7-3, 3.71) pitched seven innings, allowing a run on six hits, with one walk and six strikeouts.  Justin Thomas (2.70) pitched 1.1 shutout innings, allowing no walks and striking out two.  Jean Machi (4.03) pitched 0.2 innings, with one strikeout.

Pedro Ciriaco (.304) went 3-for-5 with a run.  Erik Kratz (.294) went 2-for-4 with two doubles, a run, and an RBI.  Jonathan Van Every (.212) went 2-for-3 with a double, a run, and an RBI.

ALTOONA CURVE (AA)

Locke

Altoona beat Portland 1-0.  Jeff Locke (W, 2-1, 3.07) pitched seven shutout innings, allowing three hits, one walk, and striking out eight.  Michael Dubee (SV, 4, 2.07) pitched two perfect innings, striking out two.

Matt Hague (.296) and Jim Negrych (.261) each went 1-for-4.  Hector Gimenez (.300) went 1-for-3 with a double and a run.

BRADENTON MARAUDERS (A+)

Marte

Bradenton beat Jupiter 8-7.  Tim Alderson (W, 3-2, 8.42) pitched five innings, allowing three runs on nine hits, with a walk and three strikeouts.  Tyler Cox (3.59) pitched 1.1 innings, allowing three runs on three walks and three hits.  Diego Moreno (1.17) pitched 1.2 perfect innings, striking out three.  Noah Krol (SV, 29, 3.45) pitched an inning, allowing one run on three hits, with no walks and two strikeouts.

Starling Marte (.325) went 3-for-5 with a double, a run, and two RBIs.  Jeremy Farrell (.298) went 2-for-4 with a stolen base.  Eric Fryer (.300) went 2-for-5 with a double, a run, and a stolen base.  Robbie Grossman (.243) went 1-for-4 with two runs and a walk.

WEST VIRGINIA POWER (A)

Cunningham

GAME STORY

West Virginia lost 10-6 to Asheville.  Quinton Miller (L, 3-2, 5.79) pitched 3.2 innings, allowing six runs on 11 hits, with two walks and three strikeouts.  Marc Baca (5.50) pitched 2.1 innings, allowing two runs on two hits, with two walks.  Gabriel Alvarado (4.58) pitched three innings, allowing two runs on one hit, with no walks and two strikeouts.

Ramon Cabrera (.259) went 3-for-4 with a run and a walk.  Jarek Cunningham (.264) went 2-for-4 with a walk, a triple, and two runs.  Elevys Gonzalez (.278) went 1-for-3 with a double, two walks, and a run.  David Rubinstein (.286) went 1-for-4 with a walk, a triple, and two RBIs.

STATE COLLEGE SPIKES (A, Short Season)

Von Rosenberg

GAME STORY

State College lost 5-4 to Jamestown.  Zach Von Rosenberg (3.38) pitched five innings, allowing one run on four hits, with two walks and six strikeouts.  Casey Sadler (3.15) pitched an inning, allowing two runs on three hits, with a walk and a strikeout.  Justin Ennis (L, 2-2, 6.26) went two innings, allowing two runs on four hits, with no walks and five strikeouts.  Ryan Beckman (5.67) pitched a perfect inning with a strikeout.

Adalberto Santos (.303) went 2-for-4 with a double, a stolen base, and an RBI.  Chase Lyles (.253) went 2-for-3 with a double and two runs.  Kelson Brown (.282) went 2-for-4 with a double and two RBIs.

GCL Pirates (RK, Short Season)

The GCL Pirates lost to the GCL Yankees 7-6.  Joely Rodriguez (4.25) pitched five innings, allowing a run on two hits, with no walks and two strikeouts.  Yeyber Sanchez (L, 4-1, 5.56) pitched 1.2 innings, allowing five unearned runs on one hit, with three walks and two strikeouts.  Fraylin Campos (3.18) pitched 2.1 innings, allowing a run on three hits, with no walks and one strikeout.

Eric Avila (.280) went 2-for-4 with a double, two runs, a stolen base, and an RBI.  Michael Trinidad (.247) went 3-for-4 with a double and two RBIs.  Junior Sosa (.301) went 1-for-3 with a run, two walks, and a stolen base.

DSL PIRATES (RK)

The DSL Pirates beat the DSL Dodgers 3-2.  Jimy Hernandez (4.43) pitched 4.1 innings, allowing two unearned runs on three hits, with four walks and three strikeouts.  Luis Valdez (3.20) pitched 3.2 shutout innings, allowing a walk and a hit and striking out one.  Aneudy Merejo (SV, 8, 2.95) pitched a shutout inning, allowing one hit.

Jodaneli Carvajal (.306) went 1-for-3.  Diego Goris (.313) went 1-for-4 with a double and a run.  Raul Fortunato (.208) went 2-for-3 with a run.

Tim Williams

Author: Tim Williams

Tim is the owner and editor in chief of Pirates Prospects. He started the site in January 2009, and turned it into his full time job during the 2011 season. Prior to starting Pirates Prospects, Tim worked with AccuScore.com, providing MLB, NHL, and NFL coverage to various national media outlets, including ESPN Insider, USA Today, Yahoo Sports, and the Wall Street Journal. He also writes the annual Prospect Guide, which is sold through the site. Tim lives in Bradenton, where he provides live coverage all year of Spring Training, mini camp, instructs, the Bradenton Marauders, and the GCL Pirates.

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  • Anonymous

    great! thanks for adding stats, thats very helpful :)

    • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

      No problem.

  • http://twitter.com/joshuabobby Josh Burns

    Completely agree and really well said. What I’ve been trying to figure out is if we could get Appel for LESS than $2.9M so we could sign some of the other guys that have more leverage…

    • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

      I don’t think you could get him for less, because then you run in to a situation where it would be beneficial for him to try again next year.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Steve-Dimmick/100000318490900 Steve Dimmick

        are my thoughts correct, that they will only be taxed on 75% of the excess amount? Meaning if they overspend the 5% of 6.5m, that makes it 6.825m. They then would be taxed on the ‘excess’, which is $325k, making it only $568k more with the 75% excess tax? Does seem like alot of money, but that could be beneficial to signing some of the other guys. I certainly hope they sign Appel, Mathisen, and Buelhler, but i hope they dont overspend on Appel and loose these guys because of Boras….i’d rather have the #9 pick next year in a much stronger draft.
        Overspend by 5% or less: 75% tax on excess amountOverspend by 5-10%: 75% tax and loss of next year’s first round pickOverspend by 10-15%: 100% tax and loss of next year’s first round AND second round picksOverspend by 15% or more: 100% tax and loss of next year’s AND the following year’s first round pick

        • TBJFAN

          You are correct. So overall, the Pirates should set an absolute maximum
          of $6.825m.

          Ideally, you want some sort of margin so $6.5m is actually a good limit. The $325k should be treated as an emergency ‘extra’ if necessary.

  • Lee Young

    Excellent article, Tim. I’m amazed at some of the clueless National articles I am reading.

    I will be surprised if Appel doesn’t sign. Btw, despite what he and Boras thinks, he is no sure thing and ‘can’t miss’.

  • gonfalon

    just to clarify… money “saved” on under-slot picks anywhere within the first 10 rounds *can* be used to sign players at over slot outside the first 10 rounds??? (I thought I had read that such pool money was not transferable.)

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=72405411 Ian Rothermund

      It’s not transferable if you don’t sign the guy. If the slot price for the 8th round pick is 450,000, and they sign the guy for 400k, they saved 50k to throw at someone else. However, if the 8th round pick chooses not to sign and go to college or if you just don’t make an offer, for instance, that doesn’t mean you’ve saved all 450,000; it just disappears.

      That’s my basic understanding, to save any money to use for someone else, means you’ve signed a pick for under the slot price somewhere else.

      • http://twitter.com/pskell02 Patrick Kelly

        Don’t think that is what he is asking.

        If they sign all of the guys in rounds 1-10 and have, for example, $500k extra, they can then use that money to spend on guys outside the top 10.

  • leadoff

    Tim, Could Appel go to Japan and get more money?

  • Greatone1210

    I really am not high on Appel and if he does not sign, that is fine by me. Considering the strength of next years draft class, having two first round picks come up in 2015 is just as good as one in 2014.

  • TBJFAN

    Tim. I agree with 100% of everything in this article. Most of what you said are things that I’ve thought of myself, but whenever I posted comments on blogs, other people just never agree with me.

    The one point I never thought of myself was that the earlier Appel signs, means the earlier he reaches the big leagues, and thus the earlier he reaches free agency. That’s a good point. If Appel doesn’t sign, then that’s one year wasted, one year further away from free agency.

    Yes the team need the player to sign, but the player also needs the team to provide the money.

    Why is Appel worth more than $6m? Because past precident says he can grab $6m. But now the rules have changed. Past precidents mean less; slot values means more. Teams need to stop bending over their backs JUST to sign players and I think this CBA will bring the necessary change.

    I’m going to start reading your blog more often.

  • szielinski

    Middle round picks who are college players have a bit more leverage than Tim claims. Teams need to sign them so that they do not lose the money allocated to that slot. Signing middle round picks becomes important for teams looking to maximize the high-ceiling talent they acquire through the draft.

    • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

      What you say is true: teams lose the money if they don’t sign the player. But that doesn’t mean the players have leverage. Because it hurts the player more if they don’t sign.

      This whole “the player could refuse to sign and hurt the team” theory is looking at it from a fan’s perspective. It’s a worst case scenario that only focuses on the negative impact to the team, and ignores the negative impact for the player. And because it ignores the negative impact for the player, it ignores the reality that players don’t really have leverage. Unless there are a lot of players out there who would throw their baseball careers away to screw a team over.

      • szielinski

        With respect to the money involved, I’d say it hurts the team as much as it hurts the player. Both have much to lose. But teams mostly cannot just punt a pick. Teams need players to sign contracts that are below slot if they want to sign their hard-to-sign picks.

        • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

          But players can’t afford to not sign. I’d say it hurts the player much more. I’m not saying there’s no impact for the team. I’m just saying the impact of losing one player is very small for the team, compared to the impact of not turning pro for that player. That’s especially true if the player is a college senior.

          • szielinski

            Having leverage and using leverage differ. Draft prospects overvalue their opportunity to play professional baseball. If they accurately assessed the probability of their reaching the majors, they’d use their leverage to extract additional money from the team that drafted them. Most won’t take that path because they value the opportunity more than they value the money.

            But the leverage exists, and they can use it if they want to.

            • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

              If all of these guys have leverage and if none of them are using it, then I think it would be more accurate to say that they don’t actually have leverage at all.

              • szielinski

                I disagree. The leverage they have is both actual and potential. They can’t destroy it by not using it. Eventually, someone will use it, thus revealing its existence.