Navy SEALs Roundtable With Dejan Kovacevic, Charlie Wilmoth, and More

Tonight I’ll be participating in a Navy SEALs roundtable over at Bucs Dugout. It was an idea proposed earlier this evening by Dejan Kovacevic, and will also be attended by Pat at WHYGAVS, Brian at Raise the Jolly Roger, and others.

Here is the link to join the discussion. This is kind of last minute. In fact, it starts a minute from now. Because of the late notice, and previous plans, I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to participate tonight, but got home on time. Feel free to join in and submit your questions.

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Tim Williams

Tim is the owner and editor in chief of Pirates Prospects. He started the site in January 2009, and turned it into his full time job during the 2011 season. Prior to starting Pirates Prospects, Tim worked with AccuScore.com, providing MLB, NHL, and NFL coverage to various national media outlets, including ESPN Insider, USA Today, Yahoo Sports, and the Wall Street Journal. He also writes the annual Prospect Guide, which is sold through the site. Tim lives in Bradenton, where he provides live coverage all year of Spring Training, mini camp, instructs, the Bradenton Marauders, and the GCL Pirates.

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  • https://profiles.google.com/116255365477483987850 john.alcorn@chp.edu

    Tim, I wish you had stood up for yourself to the bully. When you mentioned the experts agreeing that we have a good system and he said you should try evaluating it yourself you should have buried him.

    Its a shame it turned into a love fest for how brave he was doing a chat there. He is correct about many things, but no one seems to call him on his BS to his face. When he is wrong, he instantly becomes dismissive.

    You did a great job remaining professional despite his taunts about you being “angry” and others.

    • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

      I responded to a few of the comments today. I went to bed early last night (well, early for my standards). My last post in the thread was around midnight.

      He didn’t say I should try evaluating it myself. He asked why I would evaluate it, rather than just citing other people.

      • https://profiles.google.com/116255365477483987850 john.alcorn@chp.edu

        He said something like “why evaluate it yourself when you can let other people talk for you”? No? Maybe I read it wrong.

        In context, he was being sarcastic. He said the system stinks, you (and others) said all these experts say it doesn’t, he was then dismissive.

        • http://www.piratesprospects.com Tim Williams

          It was something like that. I saw it this morning.

          It just goes back to the ridiculous argument he put forward about how the system hasn’t been built up. For some reason he’s still holding on to that, as shown last night. It’s stuff like that which makes it look like he has a grudge. When he’s criticizing for something that is widely praised, that shows something.

  • http://twitter.com/jlease717 jlease717

    It was a fascinating discussion, that’s for sure. The usual internet tough guys seemed more meek when actually confronted with the person they were busy impugning. Not too unusual. That’s why names should be the only ‘handles’. As in ACTUAL names. I loved Dale Berra too, but I’m fine posting as myself.

  • RTJ02

    You are way off base thinking Kyle Stark is onto something by putting professional baseball players through mock Navy SEAL training. You mentioned many different teams that have participated, but not one other baseball team in the professional ranks. Why is that you think? After 20 years of being losers this is not the answer, and if it were I would bet that organizations that are actually successful would be participating in this type of activity also. You win baseball games by first being sound with fundamentals. The whole “hoka hey rah rah” attitude is for college. Get over yourself and observe what successful teams do with their players at the minor league level instead of arguing like kids over a timeframe for an injury that may or may not have happened during bogus drills that won’t help them win games in the first place. These guys are pathetic excuses for development staff and need to get out of baseball. Stark is an ex-volleyball player that had zero experience running a farm before he came to the Pirates. Quit defending mediocrity and ridiculousness.

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