Jim Callis sent out a tweet on Wednesday night that will get Pittsburgh Pirates fans excited about the future. We all know how good Tyler Glasnow is after following him during his dominating season last year with West Virginia. That earned the 20-year-old righty the #3 ranking in the Pirates system. He touched 99 MPH last season and would work in the mid-90's, consistently hitting 96-97 MPH.

This season, Glasnow hurt his back during Spring Training, which set him back a few weeks. Since then, he has been slowly building his way back up to full strength. According to Jim Callis, Glasnow hit 100 MPH seven times on Monday during his Extended Spring Training start. He has one more scheduled rehab start left before he joins the Bradenton Marauders roster. That means if all goes well, then ex...

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John Dreker
John was born in Kearny, NJ, hometown of the 2B for the Pirates 1909 World Championship team, Dots Miller. In fact they have some of the same relatives in common, so it was only natural for him to become a lifelong Pirates fan. Before joining Pirates Prospects in July 2010, John had written numerous articles on the history of baseball while also releasing his own book and co-authoring another on the history of the game. He writes a weekly article on Pirates history for the site, has already interviewed many of the current minor leaguers with many more on the way and follows the foreign minor league teams very closely for the site. John also provides in person game reports of the West Virginia Power and Altoona Curve.