Buster Olney continued his rankings of the top ten players at each position on Friday, naming Andrew McCutchen the second best center fielder in baseball. Not surprisingly, Mike Trout is ranked first overall, followed by McCutchen, A.J. Pollock, Lorenzo Cain and Mookie Betts in the top five spots.

The part of McCutchen's 2015 season that Olney focused the most on was his hitting with runners in scoring position. He hit .361/.494/.656 in 172 plate appearances with RISP. While he has been good in those situations in the past, this was by far his best season in that department. McCutchen finished fifth in the MVP voting this year, which was actually his lowest finish the last four years. He won his fourth straight Silver Slugger award and made his fifth straight All-Star team.

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John Dreker
John was born in Kearny, NJ, hometown of the 2B for the Pirates 1909 World Championship team, Dots Miller. In fact they have some of the same relatives in common, so it was only natural for him to become a lifelong Pirates fan. Before joining Pirates Prospects in July 2010, John had written numerous articles on the history of baseball while also releasing his own book and co-authoring another on the history of the game. He writes a weekly article on Pirates history for the site, has already interviewed many of the current minor leaguers with many more on the way and follows the foreign minor league teams very closely for the site. John also provides in person game reports of the West Virginia Power and Altoona Curve.