In the Dominican, Eric Wood played left field and went 1-for-5 with a three-run homer (shown below). This was his first home run of the winter and 20th since April, with 16 coming during the regular season in Altoona and three in the Arizona Fall League. Wood is batting .250 through nine games, with a double, homer and six walks. He hasn’t started at third base since the second game of the winter. While his defense there is considered slightly above average, he did commit an error in each of those two games.

Willy Garcia went 0-for-2 with a strikeout before being lifted for a pinch-hitter in the seventh inning. He dropped down to a .194 average.

Pablo Reyes came into Friday’s game as a pinch-runner in the seventh inning. He flew out to Mel Rojas Jr. in center field in his only at-bat. Reyes is hitting .326 through 15 games.

Kelvin Marte had his worst start of the winter, but that’s not saying much considering he had an 0.81 ERA coming into the game. He allowed two runs on six hits and one walk in five innings. He now has a 1.17 ERA through 38.1 innings. Marte is still a free agent.

In Venezuela, Jose Osuna went 2-for-4 with his 11th double and a two-run single in his team’s 3-2 loss. He is 7-for-15 in his last four games.

Elvis Escobar has been out the last few days due to inflammation in his left foot. He was originally in Wednesday’s lineup before being removed a couple hours before game time. No word from his team on when he is expected to return.

In Australia, Sam Kennelly played third base and went 1-for-3 with a walk and a run scored. He is hitting .160/.300/.160 through nine games.

In Nicaragua, Anderson Feliz is batting .330/.411/.541 through 25 games.

In Colombia, Henrry Rosario is hitting .276/.425/.345 through 75 plate appearances.

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7 COMMENTS

  1. I’ll confess that I’ve been rooting against Wood for the last few weeks so that there is less of a chance that we’ll lose him in the Rule 5 Draft. (I don’t think being drafted would be in Wood’s best interests either as it would likely inhibit his development.)

    • A player without huge upside would definitely want to be picked. You can look at a player like Wei-Chung Wang and he stuck around for the full season. Even if he doesn’t make the majors again, MLB has a rule that player’s salaries have to be at least 60% of the previous season. So he made $500K in 2014, $300K in 2015 and at least $180K last year, plus he will get a pension from MLB. If he stayed in the minors and didn’t make it, then he would have made about $25-30K over those three years, depending on his level of placement.

      You could say that season hurt his development and maybe it did, but he’s pretty well set for the future

      • Depends on the goal of the player, but I definitely felt like Wang being drafted lowered his chances of ever having success in the majors. OTOH, I had once thought the same about Bautista and things worked our alright with him.

        • With only GCL experience, his chances of putting in a full season in the majors were very low. He had the upside, but we are still talking about someone who would be in Altoona in 2017 if everything went right. We didn’t know at the time that he was Rule 5 eligible, but I can’t imagine we would have thought he would have any chance of being picked. Then he pitched like someone who had no business being in the majors, reaffirming that it was a crazy pick. He’s cleared waivers already, so if the Pirates wanted him back, they could have had him for nothing.

          • Right, I’m not faulting management for leaving Wei-Chung exposed. However, I think he would have been better off with a normal developmental path. What surprised/disappointed me in that situation was that the Brewers didn’t offer a low-level prospect so that they could keep him and send him down without essentially wasting an important developmental year and possibly undermining his confidence.

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